Skip to content

9 11 Essay Papers On Beowulf

+ All Beowulf Hero Essays:

  • Beowulf Reader Response
  • Makings of a Tragic Hero
  • Importance of a Hero in Literature
  • Project Report on Hero Honda
  • Beowulf vs Thor
  • Creon, the Tragic Hero
  • Role and evolution of the hero in literature
  • The Tragic Hero of Hamlet
  • Oprah Winfrey is a Hero
  • An Analysis of the Arguably Unified Poem, Beowulf
  • Is Othello a Tragic Hero?
  • Jocasta as a Tragic Hero
  • The Hero on Fire
  • Brutus the Tragic Hero
  • Creon: A Tragic Hero in Antigone
  • Oedipus, The Tragic Hero
  • Beowulf and Gilgamesh
  • Qualities of an Archetypal Hero
  • Analysis of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and Beowulf
  • Beowulf Perseverance
  • The Hero Myth of the Matrix
  • Jesus: The Tragic Hero
  • Monsters and Men in Macbeth, Beowulf, Frankstien
  • Hero Of Animal Farm
  • Infamy vs. Immortality: Beowulf and Gilgamesh
  • Beowulf and Anglo-Saxon Symbolism
  • Beowulf study guide
  • Shakespeare - Tragic Heros
  • The Changing Concept of Hero
  • Creon Is a Tragic Hero
  • Telemachus: the True Hero of the Odyssey
  • Beowulf Is A Pagan Work
  • Odysseus The Hero
  • The Theme of Father/Son Relationships in Beowulf & the Song of Roland
  • The Life of an Anglo-Saxon Warrior as Depicted in Beowulf
  • Christian And Pagan Ideals In Beowulf
  • Muhammad Ali Is NOT a Hero
  • Analysis of 2 Translations of Beowulf
  • Macbeth: A Tragic Hero?
  • The Germanic Heroic Code in 'Caedmon's Hymn', 'The Dream of the Rood', and 'Beowulf'
  • A Western Hero in Shane
  • Macbeth as a Tragic Hero
  • Identity in Frankenstien , Beowulf, and Sir Gawin and the Green Knight
  • Beowulf and Grendel
  • Beowulf: A Mix of Pagan and Christian Traditions
  • The Merging of Cultures in Beowulf
  • Compare and Contrast: Beowulf and Grendel
  • The Mirabal Family Hero
  • Beowulf as a Messianic Narrative
  • Anglo Saxon Culture as Reflected in Beowulf
  • Epic Heroes: Sir Gawain and Beowulf
  • Oedipus: a Tragic Hero
  • The Great Hero Odysseus
  • The Hero in Camus’s the Stranger (the Outsider)
  • Achilles in The Illiad is not a Hero
  • Othello - The Tragic Hero
  • Gilgamesh: A Mythical Hero
  • My Hero
  • Epic of Beowulf
  • Heroism as the Main Theme of Beowulf
  • The Portrayl of Religion in Beowulf
  • John Gardner's Grendel as Hero?
  • Leadership Lessons From Beowulf and Oedipus
  • Christianity and Paganism in the Epic of Beowulf
  • Beowulf: A Mix of Pagan and Christian Traditions
  • The Tragic Hero of Macbeth
  • Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and Beowulf
  • Sir Gawain vs Beowulf
  • Epic of Beowulf
  • A Summary of Beowulf
  • Beowulf and Modern United States
  • How Christianity and Paganism Coexisted in Beowulf
  • Comparison of Modern Day Heroes and Beowulf
  • A Comparison of Fierceness in Beowulf and in The Saga of King Hrolf Kraki
  • Sundiata the Hero
  • Role of Women in the Epic of Beowulf
  • Is Beowulf an Heroic Elegy or an Epic Narrative?
  • Napoleon a Hero
  • Arthur vs Beowulf
  • The Anti-Hero
  • Beowulf and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Comparison
  • Good vs. Evil Found in Beowulf
  • Henry Ford, hero or villain
  • David Malouf's Hero in Ransom
  • Odysseus in The Odyssey: Hero or Not?
  • A Summary of Beowulf
  • Hero to Villain in Macbeth by Shakespeare
  • Vengeance in the Epic of Beowulf
  • Odysseus as a Tragic Hero
  • Romantic Hero
  • A Patriotic Hero- The Contrast
  • Epic of Beowulf Essay - An Epic Poem
  • The Importance Of Beowulf In Modern America
  • Odysseus, A Hero
  • Hero Essay
  • Hero Worship

Now let's consider Beowulf's leadership. Beowulf ruled the Geat people for 50 years before he died after defeating the dragon. Beowulf does not give much insight into the protagonists' qualities as a leader or his specific actions while king. Nevertheless, the author reveals that his people were extremely sorrowful at his death, and they repeatedly declared that he was a good king. But perhaps Beowulf's virtues as a leader are not so cut-and-dried, for Beowulf's death left the Geat people in dire straits.

During Beowulf's fight with the dragon, only one of his hand-picked warriors--the young Wiglaf--did not flee in terror. Could this indicate that Beowulf--relying on his own strength as a warrior--had done a poor job of training his mean to be valiant warriors themselves?

Moreover, following his lord's death, Wiglaf lamented that the Frisians, Franks, and Swedes would probably now invade and conquer the Geats. Beowulf had to have known that his death would embolden the Geats' foes, yet he chose to ignore the risk of death and fight the dragon anyway. Was he being a heroic leader by fighting the dragon himself instead of sending in his men, or was recklessly pursuing his own glory at the expense of his kingdom's future?

A sample thesis for this topic could be as follows:

Although Beowulf was valiant warrior, he was a poor leader because he put his own glory before the well-being of his kingdom.